North Star Community Support Services had been in existence for 2… North Star Community Support Services had been in existence for 2 decades providing

North Star Community Support Services had been in existence for 2… North Star Community Support Services had been in existence for 2 decades providing a variety of social services in Greenwood County. It had a budget of $8.5 million with over 150 employees and 600 volunteers. North Star’s website advertised “Four Pillars of Service,” including youth development, domestic violence, and family services, workforce development, and legal services. North Star received the majority of its funds through government grants and contracts, and, as a result, North Star’s programs were often developed in response to available funding streams. Furthermore, despite North Star’s solid reputation in the community, organizationally it was somewhat siloed and bureaucratic, in many ways reflecting the attributes of the government agencies from which it received funding. The youth development unit provided programming to local middle school and high school-aged youth, reaching more than 800 annually. Programs included before and after-school care, gang, and drug diversion programs, and assistance with passing the high school proficiency exam that allowed participants who had dropped out, or who were at risk of dropping out, the opportunity to earn the equivalent of a high school diploma. The programs were offered in donated or rented space at several local school sites and community centers. Although there were similar programs operating in the region, including two Boys and Girls Clubs, the program itself maintained a relatively steady state, providing several beloved programs that community leaders and families had come to count on to keep kids safe and out of trouble. Some of these programs relied heavily on the development of over $400,000 in private funding every year and required the buy-in and support from several community partners, including city administrators and school district employees and counselors to continue to be effective. However, continued cuts to the state budget forced staff to scramble for funding and increased the need for even more private fund-raising and partnerships to sustain the programs. The domestic violence and family services unit provided in-home family support, group therapy, and parenting classes to over 1,000 families per year. All programming was administered by clinical therapists and social workers employed by North Star, many of whom were trained specifically in innovative and short-term mental and behavioral health methodologies. The program also relied on a vibrant group of counseling and social work interns from the local state university to support service delivery. Incidentally, the mental health expertise of the staff had enabled North Star to effectively address issues related to commercial sexual exploitation of children, a growing concern in Greenwood County. North Star’s legal services, the smallest unit in the organization by budget and staff, were provided by a cadre of lawyers and mediation experts who worked pro bono. The unit had a big impact and was therefore very efficient, serving 3,200 clients annually. Additionally, many of those who volunteered for the program personally made donations and directly solicited large philanthropic gifts from prominent law firms to support the program. The program was staffed by a full-time manager and two part-time office administrators who coordinated the volunteers. The workforce development unit was by far the most developed of the four pillars as it had grown rapidly during the Great Recession with steady funding provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. North Star used these and other federal funds to enroll people in job training programs and to provide direct job placement services. As the funds flowed in, new programs were added on to existing 3- to 5-year demonstration grants. North Star had quickly become the “go-to” nonprofit in the region when it came to job placement. However, these were programs with an expensive unit cost per client, and it could take 10 to 24 months to achieve the desired outcomes of employment and employment retention. North Star was operated under the capable leadership of a newly appointed CEO, Louisa Calderon. Louisa had enjoyed a successful career in social work, primarily in the area of youth development, working for the likes of Big Brothers Big Sisters and the YMCA. She progressed steadily professionally, and it was not long before she found herself moving out of direct service provision, taking up management positions with increasing responsibility. Prior to her position at North Star, Louisa had spent 5 years as the COO of a $5 million human services agency. Confident in her abilities to lead an organization, she was quite pleased to be recruited for the CEO position at North Star. When she first arrived at North Star, Louisa launched a personal listening tour, meeting with community members, politicians, church leaders, program clients, donors, and other stakeholders to learn more about the community and its needs. Additionally, Louisa engaged the board in a thorough financial review that also included a detailed financial forecast provided by a local consultant. Before long, it became obvious to Louisa that North Star was not fully aligned with the needs of the community. At dinner on Friday night, she shared her observations with her husband: “Essentially, the organization is reactive rather than strategic. strategic. They’ve built almost every program based on whatever grant dollars were available at the time. It feels like a house where the owners added on to make some room for a new baby, then a few years later added on again, and then again, as their family grew. Before long, the house no longer had an intentional design, and the floor plan was a mess. That’s what it feels like has happened at North Star.” “That bad, huh?” he commented. “Don’t get me wrong,” Louisa said. “There is plenty of good being done and so much opportunity to do more. Everywhere I look, I see opportunities,” she said. “Think about the counseling staff,” she continued. “They have real bench strength and capacity to address a wider variety of issues than we provide in our current services. We also have some real prospects to leverage or even completely offload youth programs to other partners. And we need to get ahead of the curve in terms of government funding. The recession is supposedly over, so I expect that workforce development money pot will be shrinking.” “Sounds like you have your work cut out for you, dear,” he told her. Louisa knew he was right. She spent the better part of that weekend thinking about how to move the organization forward. As her first order of business on Monday morning, Louisa announced that North Star would be embarking on a major strategic planning initiative. “I want to us to assess this place from top to bottom, look under every rock for new and exciting opportunities,” she told the staff.Case QuestionsWhat are the strategic decisions facing the organization?Outline the steps Louisa should take to lead an effective strategic planning process.Who should be involved?How long should it take?What resources will be needed for a thorough planning process?What potential challenges may need to be addressed?What are some trade-offs that may need to be considered along the way?What sorts of processes can North Star adopt to help it move from reactive to strategic? Business OP.MGMT PAD500 Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)

Different Harvard citation editions

Harvard citation style has undergone several editions over the years, with each edition making minor updates and changes to the guidelines. Here are some of the most common editions of Harvard citation style and an example of each:
Harvard citation style, 6th edition (1995): This is the first edition of Harvard citation style and it was used in the UK. In this edition, the reference list was placed at the end of the paper, and all sources were listed in alphabetical order by author.
Example:
Smith, J. (1998). The History of Harvard citation style. Oxford University Press.
Harvard citation style, 7th edition (2000): This edition introduced several changes, including a new way of referencing electronic sources and the use of ‘&’ instead of ‘and’ in author names.
Example:
Smith, J., & Brown, A. (2000). The history of Harvard citation style, 7th edition. Oxford University Press.
Harvard citation style, 8th edition (2010): This edition introduced a few minor changes, including the use of italics for book titles and the inclusion of the date of access for online sources.
Example:
Smith, J., & Brown, A. (2010). The History of Harvard citation style, 8th edition. Oxford University Press.

These are some of the most common Harvard citation styles and examples of each. It is important to note that different universities and institutions may have their own variations of the Harvard citation style, so it is always best to check with your professor or instructor for specific guidelines.

North Star Community Support Services had been in existence for 2…          North Star Community Support Services had been in existence for 2 decades providing a variety of social services in Greenwood County. It had a budget of $8.5 million with over 150 employees and 600 volunteers. North Star’s website advertised “Four Pillars of Service,” including youth development, domestic violence, and family services, workforce development, and legal services. North Star received the majority of its funds through government grants and contracts, and, as a result, North Star’s programs were often developed in response to available funding streams. Furthermore, despite North Star’s solid reputation in the community, organizationally it was somewhat siloed and bureaucratic, in many ways reflecting the attributes of the government agencies from which it received funding. The youth development unit provided programming to local middle school and high school-aged youth, reaching more than 800 annually. Programs included before and after-school care, gang, and drug diversion programs, and assistance with passing the high school proficiency exam that allowed participants who had dropped out, or who were at risk of dropping out, the opportunity to earn the equivalent of a high school diploma. The programs were offered in donated or rented space at several local school sites and community centers. Although there were similar programs operating in the region, including two Boys and Girls Clubs, the program itself maintained a relatively steady state, providing several beloved programs that community leaders and families had come to count on to keep kids safe and out of trouble. Some of these programs relied heavily on the development of over $400,000 in private funding every year and required the buy-in and support from several community partners, including city administrators and school district employees and counselors to continue to be effective. However, continued cuts to the state budget forced staff to scramble for funding and increased the need for even more private fund-raising and partnerships to sustain the programs. The domestic violence and family services unit provided in-home family support, group therapy, and parenting classes to over 1,000 families per year. All programming was administered by clinical therapists and social workers employed by North Star, many of whom were trained specifically in innovative and short-term mental and behavioral health methodologies. The program also relied on a vibrant group of counseling and social work interns from the local state university to support service delivery. Incidentally, the mental health expertise of the staff had enabled North Star to effectively address issues related to commercial sexual exploitation of children, a growing concern in Greenwood County. North Star’s legal services, the smallest unit in the organization by budget and staff, were provided by a cadre of lawyers and mediation experts who worked pro bono. The unit had a big impact and was therefore very efficient, serving 3,200 clients annually. Additionally, many of those who volunteered for the program personally made donations and directly solicited large philanthropic gifts from prominent law firms to support the program. The program was staffed by a full-time manager and two part-time office administrators who coordinated the volunteers. The workforce development unit was by far the most developed of the four pillars as it had grown rapidly during the Great Recession with steady funding provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. North Star used these and other federal funds to enroll people in job training programs and to provide direct job placement services. As the funds flowed in, new programs were added on to existing 3- to 5-year demonstration grants. North Star had quickly become the “go-to” nonprofit in the region when it came to job placement. However, these were programs with an expensive unit cost per client, and it could take 10 to 24 months to achieve the desired outcomes of employment and employment retention. North Star was operated under the capable leadership of a newly appointed CEO, Louisa Calderon. Louisa had enjoyed a successful career in social work, primarily in the area of youth development, working for the likes of Big Brothers Big Sisters and the YMCA. She progressed steadily professionally, and it was not long before she found herself moving out of direct service provision, taking up management positions with increasing responsibility. Prior to her position at North Star, Louisa had spent 5 years as the COO of a $5 million human services agency. Confident in her abilities to lead an organization, she was quite pleased to be recruited for the CEO position at North Star. When she first arrived at North Star, Louisa launched a personal listening tour, meeting with community members, politicians, church leaders, program clients, donors, and other stakeholders to learn more about the community and its needs. Additionally, Louisa engaged the board in a thorough financial review that also included a detailed financial forecast provided by a local consultant. Before long, it became obvious to Louisa that North Star was not fully aligned with the needs of the community. At dinner on Friday night, she shared her observations with her husband: “Essentially, the organization is reactive rather than strategic. strategic. They’ve built almost every program based on whatever grant dollars were available at the time. It feels like a house where the owners added on to make some room for a new baby, then a few years later added on again, and then again, as their family grew. Before long, the house no longer had an intentional design, and the floor plan was a mess. That’s what it feels like has happened at North Star.” “That bad, huh?” he commented. “Don’t get me wrong,” Louisa said. “There is plenty of good being done and so much opportunity to do more. Everywhere I look, I see opportunities,” she said. “Think about the counseling staff,” she continued. “They have real bench strength and capacity to address a wider variety of issues than we provide in our current services. We also have some real prospects to leverage or even completely offload youth programs to other partners. And we need to get ahead of the curve in terms of government funding. The recession is supposedly over, so I expect that workforce development money pot will be shrinking.” “Sounds like you have your work cut out for you, dear,” he told her. Louisa knew he was right. She spent the better part of that weekend thinking about how to move the organization forward. As her first order of business on Monday morning, Louisa announced that North Star would be embarking on a major strategic planning initiative. “I want to us to assess this place from top to bottom, look under every rock for new and exciting opportunities,” she told the staff.Case QuestionsWhat are the strategic decisions facing the organization?Outline the steps Louisa should take to lead an effective strategic planning process.Who should be involved?How long should it take?What resources will be needed for a thorough planning process?What potential challenges may need to be addressed?What are some trade-offs that may need to be considered along the way?What sorts of processes can North Star adopt to help it move from reactive to strategic?                                                            Business                            OP.MGMT PAD500                                                                      Share QuestionEmailCopy link                              Comments (0)

Different Harvard citation editions
Harvard citation style has undergone several editions over the years, with each edition making minor updates and changes to the guidelines. Here are some of the most common editions of Harvard citation style and an example of each:
Harvard citation style, 6th edition (1995): This is the first edition of Harvard citation style and it was used in the UK. In this edition, the reference list was placed at the end of the paper, and all sources were listed in alphabetical order by author.
Example:
Smith, J. (1998). The History of Harvard citation style. Oxford University Press.
Harvard citation style, 7th edition (2000): This edition introduced several changes, including a new way of referencing electronic sources and the use of ‘&’ instead of ‘and’ in author names.
Example:
Smith, J., & Brown, A. (2000). The history of Harvard citation style, 7th edition. Oxford University Press.
Harvard citation style, 8th edition (2010): This edition introduced a few minor changes, including the use of italics for book titles and the inclusion of the date of access for online sources.
Example:
Smith, J., & Brown, A. (2010). The History of Harvard citation style, 8th edition. Oxford University Press.

These are some of the most common Harvard citation styles and examples of each. It is important to note that different universities and institutions may have their own variations of the Harvard citation style, so it is always best to check with your professor or instructor for specific guidelines.

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